Publications

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    Journal Article

    Dan Vimont, David S. Battisti, Rosamond L. Naylor
    International Journal of Climatology, 2009

    This study investigates the skill of linear methods for downscaling provincial-scale precipitation over Indonesia from fields that describe the large-scale circulation and hydrological cycle. The study is motivated by the strong link between large-scale variations in the monsoon and the El Nino - Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and regional precipitation, and the subsequent impact of regional precipitation on rice production in Indonesia.

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    Journal Article

    David Lobell, Kenneth Cassman, Christopher Field
    Annual Review of Environment and Resources, 2009

    Future trajectories of food prices, food security, and cropland expansion are closely linked to future average crop yields in the major agricultural regions of the world. Because the maximum possible yields achieved in farmers' fields might level off or even decline in many regions over the next few decades, reducing the gap between average and potential yields is critical. In most major irrigated wheat, rice, and maize systems, yields appear to be at or near 80% of yield potential, with no evidence for yields having exceeded this threshold to date. A

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    Working Paper

    David Lobell
    2009

    In June 2009, a group of experts in climate science, crop modeling, and crop development gathered at Stanford University to discuss the major needs for successful crop adaptation to climate change. To focus discussion over the three day period, the meeting centered on just three major crops – rice, wheat, and maize – given that these provide the bulk of calories to most populations. The meeting also focused on two aspects of climate– extreme high temperatures and extreme low moisture conditions (i.e.

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    Journal Article

    Peter Vitousek, Rosamond Naylor, et al
    Science, 2009

    Nutrient cycles link agricultural systems to their societies and surroundings; inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus in particular are essential for high crop yields, but downstream and downwind losses of these same nutrients diminish environmental quality and human well-being. Agricultural nutrient balances differ substantially with economic development, from inputs that are inadequate to maintain soil fertility in parts of many developing countries, particularly those of sub-Saharan Africa, to excessive and environmentally damaging surpluses in many developed and rapidly growing economies.

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    Journal Article

    Matei Georgescu, G. Miguez-Macho, L.T Steyaert, C.P. Weaver
    Journal of Geophysical Research, 2009

    This paper is part 2 of a two-part study evaluating the climatic effect of one of the nation's most rapidly expanding metropolitan complexes, the Greater Phoenix, Arizona, region.

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    Journal Article

    Matei Georgescu, G. Miquez-Macho, L. T. Steyaert, C. P. Weaver
    Journal of Geophysical Research, 2009

    This paper is part 1 of a two-part study that evaluates the climatic effects of recent landscape change for one of the nation's most rapidly expanding metropolitan complexes, the Greater Phoenix, Arizona, region. The region's landscape evolution over an approximate 30-year period since the early 1970s is documented on the basis of analyses of Landsat images and land use/land cover (LULC) data sets derived from aerial photography (1973) and Landsat (1992 and 2001).

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    Book

    Rosamond Naylor
    Springer, in "Principles of Natural Resource Stewardship: Resilience-Based Management in a Changing World", Chapin, Kofinas, Folke (eds), 2009
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    Journal Article

    Zhiying Xu, Bill Burke, Thomas S. Jayne, Jones Govereh
    Agricultural Economics, 2009

    Abstract: Many governments in developing countries distribute fertilizer at subsidized prices in an effort to stimulate small farmers' agricultural productivity and food security. Prior fertilizer demand studies have largely failed to account for the effects of government programs on farmers' commercial purchases. Using a double hurdle model and nationally representative rural household panel data in Zambia, we distinguish between these sources and measure the contemporaneous “crowding in” and “crowding out” effects of government input programs on commercial fertilizer sales.

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