Disease

Scholarly Publications

Health Impact Assessment of Global Climate Change: Expanding upon Comparative Risk Assessment Approaches for Policy Making

April 2008

Climate change is projected to have adverse impacts on public health. Cobenefits may be possible from more upstream mitigation of greenhouse gases causing climate change.

Climate Change and Global Health: Quantifying a Growing Ethical Crisis

November 2007

Climate change, as an environmental hazard operating at the global scale, poses a unique and "involuntary exposure" to many societies, and therefore represents possibly the largest health inequity...

Disease Emergence from Global Climate and Land Use Change

November 2008

Climate change and land use change can affect multiple infectious diseases of humans, acting either independently or synergistically.

News

Five foreign policy questions for Obama and Romney

October 2012

With the third and final debate between President Obama and Mitt Romney set to focus on foreign policy, researchers from the Freeman Spogli Institute ask the questions they want answered and...

Child health in Kenya improves with access to clean water

December 2013

Children in rural Kenya are more susceptible to disease and death the farther away they live from clean drinking water, according to Stanford researchers.

New Stanford study suggests climate mitigation could yield trillions in economic benefits

May 2018

Failing to meet climate mitigation goals laid out in the U.N.

Projects

Deadly Connections: Climate, Disease, Poverty and Conflict

Violent conflicts claim 3,000 lives per day through wars, bombings and attacks that dominate the news media.
English

Feeding the World in the 21st Century: Exploring the Connections between Food Production, Health, Environmental Resources, and International Security

This project involves political scientists, economists, and medical researchers to address the question of whether hunger, poverty, disease and agricultural resource constraints foster civil...
English

Fertilizer Use and the Epidemiology and Evolution of Cholera in Bangladesh

The use of chemical fertilizers in developing countries made possible the Green Revolution, and as a result many regions once visited by periodic famines are now food self-sufficient.
English

People

Yi Zhao PhD student, Earth System Science